Saturday, March 10, 2018

Sabertooth tiger

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Vincent Schiavelli

The first time I saw Vincent Schiavelli was in the 1990 film "Ghost". He was a believable troubled spirit haunting the subway when "Sam" Patrick Swayze ran into him and learned how to navigate between the spirit world and the earthly world. -Greg

Monday, February 26, 2018

Jason Bateman

Pencil Sketch of the Day...
Jason Bateman

I have a tendency to evolve into William Shatner, with my big fat face. — Jason Bateman

Jason Kent Bateman (born January 14, 1969) is an American actor, director, and producer. He began acting on television in the early 1980s on Little House on the Prairie, Silver Spoons, and The Hogan Family.

In the 2000s, he became known for his role of Michael Bluth using deadpan comedy in the sitcom Arrested Development, for which he won a Golden Globe and a Satellite Award.

He has also had starring roles in the films Juno (2007), Hancock (2008), Up in the Air (2009), Extract (2009), The Switch (2010), Paul (2011), Horrible Bosses (2011), The Change-Up (2011), Identity Thief (2013), Bad Words (2013), Horrible Bosses 2 (2014), The Gift (2015), Office Christmas Party (2016) and Zootopia (2016), as well as the 2017 Netflix series Ozark.

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Saturday, February 24, 2018

Earl Holliman

Earl Holliman

(born September 11, 1928) is an American actor. He is well known for his many character roles in films, mostly westerns and dramas, in the 1950s and 1960s, winning a Golden Globe Award for the 1956 film The Rainmaker. He also portrayed the role of Police Sergeant Bill Crowley on the television police drama Police Woman throughout its 1974–1978 run.

Source: Wikipedia

Friday, February 23, 2018

Henry Dunant (1828-1910), Founder of the International Red Cross.

Pencil on vellum textured bristol paper.
Henry Dunant (1828-1910), Founder of the International Red Cross.

Friday, December 8, 2017

John Glenn Sketch of the Day for Friday, January 8, 2017

John Glenn
Sketch of the Day for Friday, January 8, 2017

John Herschel Glenn Jr. (July 18, 1921 – December 8, 2016) was a United States Marine Corps aviator, engineer, astronaut, and United States Senator from Ohio. In 1962, he became the first American to orbit the Earth, circling it three times.

Before joining NASA, Glenn was a distinguished fighter pilot in World War II, China and Korea. He shot down three MiG-15 aircraft, and was awarded six Distinguished Flying Crosses and eighteen Air Medals. In 1957, he made the first supersonic transcontinental flight across the United States. His on-board camera took the first continuous, panoramic photograph of the United States.

He was one of the Mercury Seven, military test pilots selected in 1959 by NASA as the United States' first astronauts. On February 20, 1962, Glenn flew the Friendship 7 mission, becoming the first American to orbit the Earth, and the fifth person and third American in space. He received the NASA Distinguished Service Medal in 1962 and the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 1978, was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1990, and was the last surviving member of the Mercury Seven.

Glenn resigned from NASA in January 1964. He planned to run for a U.S. Senate seat from Ohio, but an injury in February 1964 forced his withdrawal. He retired from the Marine Corps the following year. He lost a close primary election in 1970. A member of the Democratic Party, Glenn first won election to the Senate in 1974 and served for 24 years until January 1999.

In 1998, while still a sitting senator, Glenn became the oldest person to fly in space as a crew member of the Discovery space shuttle and the only person to fly in both the Mercury and Space Shuttle programs. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012.

Source: Wikipedia

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Spencer Tracy

Spencer Tracy.
Sketch of the Day for Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Spencer Bonaventure Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967)[1] was an American actor, noted for his natural style and versatility. One of the major stars of Hollywood's Golden Age, Tracy won two Academy Awards for Best Actor, from nine nominations, sharing the record for nominations in that category with Laurence Olivier.

Tracy first discovered his talent for acting while attending Ripon College, and he later received a scholarship for the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. He spent seven years in the theatre, working in a succession of stock companies and intermittently on Broadway. Tracy's breakthrough came in 1930, when his lead performance in The Last Mile caught the attention of Hollywood. After a successful film debut in Up the River, Tracy was signed to a contract with Fox Film Corporation. His five years with Fox were unremarkable, and he remained largely unknown to audiences after 25 films, most of them starring Tracy as the leading man. None of them were hits although The Power and the Glory (1933) features one of his most acclaimed performances.

In 1935, Tracy joined Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, at the time Hollywood's most prestigious studio. His career flourished with a series of hit films, and in 1937 and 1938 he won consecutive Oscars for Captains Courageous and Boys Town. By the 1940s, Tracy was one of the studio's top stars. In 1942, he appeared with Katharine Hepburn in Woman of the Year, beginning a popular partnership that produced nine movies over 25 years. Tracy left MGM in 1955, and continued to work regularly as a freelance star, despite an increasing weariness as he aged. His personal life was troubled, with a lifelong struggle against alcoholism and guilt over his son's deafness. Tracy became estranged from his wife in the 1930s, but never divorced, conducting a long-term relationship with Katharine Hepburn in private. Towards the end of his life, Tracy worked almost exclusively for director Stanley Kramer. It was for Kramer that he made his last film, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner in 1967, completed just 17 days before Tracy's death.

During his career, Tracy appeared in 75 films and developed a reputation among his peers as one of the screen's greatest actors. In 1999 the American Film Institute ranked Tracy as the 9th greatest male star of Classic Hollywood Cinema.

Source: Wikipedia