Friday, March 6, 2020

Pencil Sketch of the Day: Peter Lorre 1904 – 1964

Pencil Sketch...
Peter Lorre 1904 – 1964
Lorre was a Hungarian-born American character actor of Jewish descent. Lorre began his stage career in Vienna before moving to Germany where he worked first on the stage, then in film in Berlin in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Lorre caused an international sensation in the German film M (1931), directed by Fritz Lang, in which he portrayed a serial killer who preys on little girls.
Lorre left Germany when Adolf Hitler came to power. His second English-language film, following the multiple-language version of M (1931), was Alfred Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) made in Great Britain.[1][2] Eventually settling in Hollywood, he later became a featured player in many Hollywood crime and mystery films. In his initial American films, Mad Love and Crime and Punishment (both 1935), he continued to play murderers, but he was then cast playing Mr. Moto, the Japanese detective, in a B-picture series.
From 1941 to 1946, he mainly worked for Warner Bros. His first film at Warner was The Maltese Falcon (1941), the first of many films in which he appeared alongside actors Humphrey Bogart and Sydney Greenstreet. This was followed by Casablanca (1942), the second of the nine films in which Lorre and Greenstreet appeared together. Lorre's other films include Frank Capra's Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) and Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954). Frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner, his later career was erratic. Lorre was the first actor to play a James Bond villain as Le Chiffre in a TV version of Casino Royale (1954). Some of his last roles were in horror films directed by Roger Corman.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Sketch of the Day: Claude Rains - 1889 - 1967

William Claude Rains (10 November 1889 – 30 May 1967) was a British-American film and stage actor whose career spanned six decades. After his American film debut as Dr. Jack Griffin in The Invisible Man (1933) he appeared in classic films such as The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), The Wolf Man (1941), Casablanca and Kings Row (both 1942), Notorious (1946), The Pied Piper of Hamelin (1957), and Lawrence of Arabia (1962).
He was a Tony Award winning actor and was a four-time nominee for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Rains was considered to be "one of the screen's great character stars"[1] who was, according to the All-Movie Guide, "at his best when playing cultured villains".[2] During his lengthy career, he was greatly admired by many of his acting colleagues, such as Bette DavisVincent ShermanRonald NeameAlbert DekkerJohn GielgudCharles Laughton and Richard Chamberlain.

Monday, March 2, 2020

Sketch of the Day: Alexander Gauge

Sketch of the Day:
Alexander Gauge, character actor
1914-1960
A British actor best known for playing Friar Tuck in The Adventures of Robin Hood from 1955 to 1959. Born in a Methodist Mission station in Wenzhou in China, Gauge was a well-known English character actor. Gauge attended school in California before moving to England.

Friday, February 28, 2020

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov



Anton Chekhov  29 January 1860  – 15 July 1904 was a Russian playwright and short-story writer who is considered to be among the greatest writers of short fiction in history. His career as a playwright produced four classics, and his best short stories are held in high esteem by writers and critics.  Along with Henrik Ibsen and August Strindberg, Chekhov is often referred to as one of the three seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre. Chekhov practiced as a medical doctor throughout most of his literary career: "Medicine is my lawful wife", he once said, "and literature is my mistress." 

Chekhov renounced the theatre after the reception of The Seagull in 1896, but the play was revived to acclaim in 1898 by Konstantin Stanislavski's Moscow Art Theatre, which subsequently also produced Chekhov's Uncle Vanya and premiered his last two plays, Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard. These four works present a challenge to the acting ensemble as well as to audiences, because in place of conventional action Chekhov offers a "theatre of mood" and a "submerged life in the text" 

Chekhov had at first written stories to earn money, but as his artistic ambition grew, he made formal innovations which have influenced the evolution of the modern short story. He made no apologies for the difficulties this posed to readers, insisting that the role of an artist was to ask questions, not to answer them.

Source: Wikipedia

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Anthony Mackie

Anthony Mackie (born September 23, 1978) is an American actor and film producer. He has been featured in films, television series and Broadway and Off-Broadway plays, including Ma Rainey's Black BottomDrowning CrowMcReeleA Soldier's Play and Carl Hancock Rux's Talk, for which he won an Obie Award in 2002.
In 2002, he was featured in Eminem's film debut, 8 Mile. He was nominated for Independent Spirit Award for Best Actor for his role in Brother to Brother.[4] His second nomination was for Best Supporting Actor at the 2009 Independent Spirit Awards for his role in The Hurt Locker.
He achieved global recognition with his portrayal of Sam Wilson / Falcon in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, making his first appearance in Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) and later in Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Ant-Man (2015), Captain America: Civil War (2016), Avengers: Infinity War (2018), and Avengers: Endgame (2019), as well as the upcoming Disney+ exclusive limited series, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier.
In May 2016, he co-starred in the HBO TV film All the Way, and will star in the second season of Netflix's Altered Carbon in 2020.

Monday, February 24, 2020

February Birth.. Dr. Henry Heimlich Born: February 3, 1920

February Birth..

Dr. Henry Heimlich
Born: February 3, 1920
Died: December 17, 2016

He was an American thoracic surgeon and medical researcher.

He is widely credited as the inventor of the Heimlich maneuver

The technique uses abdominal thrusts to stop choking
described in Emergency Medicine in 1974.

He also invented the Micro Trach portable oxygen system for ambulatory patients and the Heimlich Chest Drain Valve, or "flutter valve", which drains blood and air out of the chest cavity.